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have a foreign policy that is coming apart. >>gregg: you were in the carter administration. all hands on deck the. >> the president himself, for ten, 15, 20 hours a day, in the middle of the greatest moments of this, involved himself personally. we were trying to get them out the day they flew home we were there all night and the next morning up until the time of the inauguration and the president was hands on. the notion this president was disengaged and talked to no one after the 15 minute meeting and went off the next day to a fundraiser? now we understand and this is causing the republicans today to start saying, patrol and -- start saying, graham and others, they will hold up the nomination. >>gregg: does it appear lights were out at the white house while an american diplomat was underattack and other americans? >> that is right. to me, the bottom line question that pat raises and you raised, too, do we have a coherent foreign policy and national security policy not only through iran and north korea but through the role of the united states in rooting out terrorism in north afric
.s. troop surge in iraq raises some serious questions about his judgment on foreign policy. >> you saw the hearing. you know his record. are you going to support him for defense secretary? >> i will see the answers to his questions but i have grave concerns. >> grave concerns? >> yes. >> would it be fair to say you're leaning against voting for him? >> i think that would be fair. >> both criticisms follow a blistering attack on saturday by former vice president dick cheney. the performance now of barack obama as he staffs up the national security team for a second term is dismal. frankly, what he has appointed are second rate people. >>> there's a new u.s. commander in afghanistan in what could be the final reshuffling of american leadership before coalition troops are withdrawn on schedule by the end of next year. general joseph dumford took over on saturday. a four star marine officer replaces general john allen. he's been nominated to lead nato forces in europe. general dunford will play a leading role in how many american troops will stay in that country post 2014. meanwhile, forme
, had choice words for the president's foreign policy team. i'm not sure i agree with that. in "the new york times," a great must-read, quietly killing a consumer watchdog. it's how the republicans are just doing everything they can not to have the consumer financial protection bureau that was created by elizabeth warren under president obama actually function because it would keep them, quite frankly, from being able to get their money from all their donors on wall street. and they do not want to lose the people who helped them out. so they want to make sure that the consumer suffers so that they can gain politically. it's a good one. take a look at it. coming up -- >> we're also going to talk about nancy pelosi saying we don't have a spending problem, and the problem with medicare is not medicare. we've got a lot to talk about straight ahead. >> gail collins of "the new york times" joins us straight ahead. >> she's got a great column. >> i love it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely,
an important foreign policy shift both in terms of process and engagement in the region. when i say process i say that it is grounded for the first time in our history in the bedrock of parliamentry consent, public legitimacy, and many stakeholders that matter being onboard in the manging of foreign policy. so this is a first for pakistan, including our relationship with the united states, which is now pretty much run by parliamentry guidelines, and we move affording to those now, which does empower us to take decisions that are sustainable, we hope. and we look for a relationship that is long lasting and not just a function of our relationship with the united states and pakistan as it transitions after the region. >> thank you for that. did they offer you breakfast? >> yes, they did. >> so busy taking notes. let me ask you one or two and move to my colleagues. you were early in offering congratulations to john kerry. i wanted to ask you about the impact if any you see kerry moving in as secretary of state is going to have. as you know the "wall street journal" ran an oped piece last week tal
/11 obviously certainly on foreign policy became much more conservative. >> he always was. i mean, he was always a sort of new york zionist, supported israel wholeheartedly, you know, sent a delegation to central america in the mid-'80s to chart a course against, you know, sort of the communist rule in nicaragua. that sort of thing in foreign policy terms. but in sort of fiscal terms and in governance terms, he would say, you know, siding with criminals over law-abiding citizens is nuts. saying it's okay to do graffiti on subways is nuts. saying that it's okay for homeless people to sleep on grates on second avenue is nuts. this was all very much the way ordinary people felt, and they felt that democrats and the leadership of the left had turned against ordinary citizens and the good order of their lives. and he stood up against that. >> right. and seemed same and rational unless you were a member of the democratic establishment in the late '70s and '80s when koch was mayor. so it sounds very sane and rational right now in new york city. it didn't at the time. >> it was a much different -- the t
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> my -- >> yes or no. >> my reference to -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> well, let the record show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was senator john mccain grilling his old friend chuck hagel last week at hagel's confirmation hearing. the senate armed services committee was supposed to vote today on hagel's nomination to head the pentagon, but that vote has been postponed after republicans said they hadn't received sufficient information about hagel's financial records and specifically about any payments he's received from foreign sources. that's an odd hurdle given that republicans never seem concerned about foreign revenue sources when it came to nominees from
of jerusalem. i thought we would talk about current events and foreign policy. he said, i want to talk to about the city of jerusalem in the year 66. he said, the year 66, titus and the romans laid siege to the city of jerusalem. the city of jerusalem would not relent. years and years passed by. finally, up one person told him that if you want to take the city, you need to wait and be patient. inside the city, there is a problem. that problem will grow into a cancer and that cancer will eat away the very core of that community. if you know your history, what happened around the year 70 is the divisions within the city of jerusalem amongst the zealots and others became so significant that it weakened the city from inside. the rabbi told me that the city of jerusalem was taken in the year 70 by titus. he looked at me for a long time and i looked at him. he said, what is the moral of the story? i said, make sure there are no zealots in newark. [laughter] he said no. he said, the moral of this story is that if there is no enemy within, the enemy without tim do you know arm. he started growth -- goi
, republican -- one comes in and another goes out. nothing seems to change. it is the exact same foreign policy. it is almost like there is an unseen hand behind both parties. host: do you think you have been given full information about what is happening with the use of drones? do you want to know more about what the u.s. is doing or do you feel like you know enough? caller: what i have seen it, -- abc, cbs, all that a -- i mean, we will never know what they are doing with them. but my main concern, since i've lived in america and i am an american, is there are plans to have drones patrolling our skies. homeland security has ordered drones. they say they are just for surveillance, but it is not a good idea to have remote- control -- heavy ever read "1984" by george orwell? it started like that. you can't have so much power congregated in so few hands. it is in its power to have not only surveillance from the air but also bombing capability, remote-controlled bombing capability. and the decisions made by just a very few people. over a whole population -- it is even passed what george orwell cou
in the region, we have made an important foreign policy shift, both in terms of process and engagement and i say that it is grounded for the first time in our history and the bedrock of parliamentary consent, public legitimacy and many stakeholders that matter the mount board. this is a first for pakistan, including our relationship with the united states, which is pretty much run by parliamentary guidelines and remove according to those now, which doesn't power us to take decisions that are sustainable and we let our relationship that is long-lasting and not just a function of our relationship in the united states and afghanistan as it transitions out of the region. >> today offer you breakfast quite >> yesterday. >> are so busy taking notes. let me ask you a noble move to our colleagues. graduations to john kerry, i wanted to ask you at the impact of moving the secretary of state is going to have. as you know "the wall street journal" ran an op-ed piece last week talking about how at least the view in india is kerry told stories pakistan. what is your sense of the importance of any of kerry's
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. for these reasons, i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency and related measures blocking the property of certain persons contributing to the conflict. signed, barack obama, the white house, february 4, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until 6:30 p.m. >> here's a look at our prime time schedule after the house of representatives new york mayor cory booker, up coming state of the union address. that's here on c-span. at 8:00 p.m. eastern the commutetors the ahead community -- special inspector general for afghanistan says the u.s. spent more than $50 billion to help build a afghan national security force. he said the u.s. is missing key information about the force. he spoke to the center of strategic and international study. >> welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sofco who is the special inspector ge
that you look up the article that was written on gentry 17th in the foreign policy magazine about egis at the kabul industry and the problems that have already surfaced about them. now i have talked to patrick kennedy about this and his staff has come over and briefed by staff that they believe it is doing just fine. the end of this i have to tell you the umbrella contract for the high level security in the sea is a 10 billion-dollar contract over five years and i won't go into the report of the background check but it's $100 -- $100 million a year. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. somebody has got to do cost-benefit analysis. all that i told you. can you imagine in the money that we spent fooling around with these contractors the were not getting the job done can you imagine the time we spend and the money that has been spent? i would like for you to talk about the cost benefits of putting marines on the embassy's when we are in contingencies and why this is so hard to get our arms around and how are we saving any money? >> welcome a senator, just to react
to the west bank and jordan in the spring, stepping into some of the thorniest foreign-policy challenges facing his second term. also, and other news, about sequestration, the across-the- board spending cuts for the defense department and non- defense programs. here's the economy and business section of the washington post -- march 1 is that deadline. and the navy trims a goal for the size of its fleet, which has sparked concern on capitol hill. those are some other headlines for you this morning. also, we told you yesterday about the justice department deciding to sue the s&p ratings company over the financial crisis and how they rated the mortgage bonds. "usa today" money section says -- we will go to randy in missouri, democratic caller. back to our topic, randy, about drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. go ahead. caller: good morning, greta. this policy out there is not something that has been a secret. it has always been out there. even people in the senate knew about this policy. second, this is about people who are taking up arms who are u.s. citizens, deciding to plot with t
could all use some of her gumption. so you can catch her blogging on the foreign policy association web site. she has a book out called "a woman's war, reaching out it young people looking for a career in intelligence." next friday i'll be right back here with gretchen on the curvy couch with a story of colonel guy blueford, first african-american in space. he's always believed anything is possible and has shown the world he has the right stuff. it's part of the american history we all share. >> gretchen: what i love about the stories is you see from the very beginning early on in their lives that they know what they want to do and how they're going to get there and sometimes it's a rocky road, but they get there. >> i loved just her glimpse of making the impossible happen. not listening to those outside voices that sometimes can put doubt in their mind. >> gretchen: everyone can relate to that. see you next week. >> thanks. >> gretchen: the president says he doesn't have a spending problem, but take a look at this brand-new fox poll. the american people don't agree with that. we'll ana
for not leaking. and what we also see in this is that foreign policy is really run from the white house and not from anywhere else. this is a very white house centric national security team and i think that the president is, of course, first among equals. if you look at those people up on the screen, wolf, it is the president of the united states who made that decision on osama bin laden, hillary clinton and leon panetta wanted to arm the rebels and it was the president who decided differently. so it's very much center data. >> the president of the united states, who makes a decision over rejecting the advice, in the end it's up to him. >> of course it's up to him. what modern presidents center their policy in the white house and if the president is making decisions about his to him is who are the people next to him? and cabinets over the last decade or two, you have strong members of cabinets, no doubt about it. but the policymaking, more and more centered out of that oval office and out of the people who are in that small piece of real estate right around the president. >> what's the
and said the principles of american foreign policy are firmly -- the foundation is firmly rooted in righteousness and justice. we get to do great things here. this is a remarkable place. i am here today to rescue, on -- to ask you, on behalf of the country, i need your help. president obama need your help. to help us, to do everything we can to strengthen our nation and to carry those ideals out into the world. here, we can do the best of things you can do in government. that's what excites me. we get to try to make our nation safer. get to try to make peace in the world, a world where there is far too much conflict, far too much killing. there are alternatives. we get to try to cure disease and empower people who have no voice. we get to talk about empowering people through our ideals and through those ideals hopefully they can change their lives. that's what's happening in the world today. we get to live the ideals of our nation which and in doing , so i think we can make our country stronger and we can make the world more peaceful. so i look forward to joining with you as we m
interrogation techniques and barack obama spent most of his first term ripping president bush on his policies and even did it on foreign soil. >> under my administration the united states does not torture. my administration is going to operate in a way that leaves no doubt that we do not torture, that we abide by the geneva conventions. >> waterboarding is torture. it is contrary to america's traditions. it is contrary to our ideals. that s not who we are. that is not how we operate and anybody who was actually -- has actually read about and understands the practice it of waterboarding would say that that is torture. and that is not something we do. period. >> sean: we don't torture terrorists we just kill them. endorsing torture, running a lawless president icy with this drone program obama has gone lightyears beyond what the bush administration did. and by the way, if bush ever attempted this narrative, these policies, i'm telling you democrats would have been calling for are bush's impeachment. it is important to remind the american people exactly what the bush administration did in terms
, accounting down the road, but we'll save that for another day. but to look at policies that really do streamline the process, reduce wait times, make visas more readily available, and really just makes the united states a more simpler place, a more business friendly place, to keep foreign workers were educated here, here as well as people, again, a nation that was founded by immigrants, to promote from unemployment stand for in order to make it a more user-friendly special. we've seen a lot of the proposals that have come out. definitely immigration week. we have seen the president's proposal, the senate gang of eight proposal, which includes a high skilled piece of the and we hope it gets the attention that it deserves in the broader, on the broader discussion. at reasoned approach, and look at things that, including things that are also interested other legislation. you may also see the bill that was introduced i squared bill which was a lot of the positive interesting and things that would really help i think high-tech engine with and keeping talent here, one of which is waving the
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)